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PBS NEEDS TO GO BACK AND LEARN THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A STATE CABINET AND PRESIDENTIAL COUNCIL: UPKO YOUTH

KOTA KINABALU: Parti Bersatu Sabah (PBS) and its vice president Datuk Johnny Mositun needs to go back to school and learn the difference between the State Cabinet and a Presidential Council of the coalition government.

Upko Youth Deputy Chief, Kennedy John Angian in a statement here today said Upko Youth made the call since Mositun’s statement had shown a total misconception of the two entities.

“Yes, all the parties in the coalition are represented but the Cabinet is solely for the purpose of administering the State Government,” he said.

Kennedy John. SNT File Pix

Kennedy was responding to Mositun’s statement on Christmas Day rejecting the call by Upko Youth Chief, Felix Joseph Saang on the need for a Presidential Council comprising leaders of parties in the State Goverment coalition.

Describing it as “laughable”, Mositun had said that each party leader were already represented in the State Cabinet and have direct access to the Chief Minister.

However, Kennedy said Mositun should know that it was inappropriate for the State Cabinet to discuss about politics during their meetings when they should be discussing about the state’s administrative  matters.

“As the former Secretary General of PBS, Mositun has attended the BN supreme council meetings representing PBS before.

“Based on his logics in demonising Upko Youth’s suggestion, how come Mositun never make the call for the BN supreme council to be disbanded since he had said such entity is not relevant as all the party leaders are already in the Cabinet with direct access to the Prime Minister.

“If it is not relevant, why did he become a part of the BN supreme council members, a body that is similar in nature with the presidential council that has been suggested by Upko Youth to be set up in Sabah,” he said.

Therefore, Kennedy said it was clear that a Presidential Council was imperative in order to further strengthen cooperation among the coalition parties.

“It is so the best platform to address political issues among the coalition parties, which ought to be segregated from the state’s administrative,” he said.

Towards this end, Kennedy said the call by Felix was apt in order to ensure a better cooperation and understanding among all the coalition government members.

“The Youth hope Mositun is clear on this,” he said.

On the issue that Upko leaders have left the party, Kennedy asked Mositun if he was aware just how many of its leaders have left PBS since its inception.

Mositun had ridiculed the present coalition State government but “he forgot that their party’s own coalition – Gabungan Bersatu Sabah – has sunk even before it has set sail

“This becomes more ironic if one consider the fact that the Joint-Chairman of GBS is also the leader of PBS. Mositun should better devote his attention towards solving GBS internal issues,” he said.

Kennedy said Mositun should do his own little research first before harping on Upko’s decision to form an alliance with Warisan and Pakatan Harapan.

“PBS joined BN in 1986, left the BN in 1990 and rejoined the coalition in 2002 and then once again ditching it in 2018.

“Now we really don’t know just how long PBS will be able to stay in GBS,” he said.

Kennedy concurred with Felix that so much still needs to be done to bolster the State coalition government.

“Upko Youth are not hypocrites like Mositun and we dare admit about the challenges faced by each party in the coalition.

“But, we are also optimistic that this coalition government will be galvanised to bring the State Government and Sabah to a higher pedestal with strong commitment coupled with cooperation from all,” he said.

Meanwhile, he said Upko Youth was disappointed that a senior politician like Mositun felt it was allright to exploit Christmas Day to launch his political attacks.

“Nevertheless, Upko Youth wish him a Merry Christmas and hope he will be given the light of prosperity and peace during these festive seasons,” said Kennedy.-SabahNewsToday